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sábado, 2 de maio de 2015

Developing a new approach to information literacy learning design | McNicol | Journal of Information Literacy



The resulting model, InFlow, has been designed to encourage students to engage with information in a variety of ways as they map, explore, ask, make, reflect, imagine, show and collaborate. The rationale behind the development of this model raises fundamental questions about current teaching practices in relation to IL, such as the need to encourage collaborative working; the role of students as producers of information as well as consumers; and the privileging of particular types of information sources and outputs. This article describes the process by which this model was developed, based on approaches used in iTEC, and explains how it responds to criticisms of existing models. A short case study of the use of InFlow in a UK university library demonstrates how the model can work in practice to create IL programmes for students of the 21st century. (...)
The
findings of the iTEC project in relation to IL are, therefore,
supported by the wider literature; both suggest that existing IL
models do not adequately support emerging 21st century pedagogies.
However, a series of Learning Activities devised in the fourth iTEC
cycle (2013) appeared to offer a potential way to structure an IL
learning design model which could respond to the issues described
above. These learning activities were:

Dream’:
Introducing, understanding and questioning a design brief;

Explore’:
Collecting information in relation to the design brief;

Map’:
Creating a mind-map to understand relations between the collected
information;

Reflect’:
Recording audio-visual reflections and feedback;

Make’:
Creating a design;
Ask’:
Performing workshops with people who may represent future users of
the design;
Show’:
Publishing and presenting designs to an audience;
Collaborate’:
Form ad-hoc collaborations with learners from other schools.
To
support teachers in the implementation of these Learning Activities,
the iTEC team prepared detailed descriptions for each activity, which
included a descriptive narrative, suggested classroom activities,
ideas for using technology, and potential teacher and student
outcomes.
Developing a new approach to information literacy learning design
Sarah McNicol, Emily Shields2014, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 23-35
Developing a new approach to information literacy learning design | McNicol | Journal of Information Literacy